Northwest Park

Northwest Park(温莎)

Northwest Park
4.5

4.5
85 条点评
极佳
56
非常好
26
一般
2
较差
0
很糟糕
1

Lee G
新罕布什尔州Peterborough234 条分享
2021年8月
There are places to have a picnic, see animals, take a walk. A very pretty place to exercise or just relax.
撰写日期:2021年9月13日
此点评为 Tripadvisor 会员所写的主观评论,并不代表 TripAdvisor LLC 的观点。

dustythoughts
康涅狄格曼彻斯特1,460 条分享
2021年5月
This beautiful park is a hidden gem of Windsor and is much bigger than it appears from the parking lot (it's almost 500 acres of what used to be tobacco farmland). It has several walking trails that go on for twelve miles, streams and ponds, and places to sit and take in the gorgeous scenery. There's a maple sugar house, an animal barn, a large picnic area, a tobacco factory, a dog park (although please leash your dog everywhere else in the park), and soccer fields. We saw geese and cows in the animal area, although some of the animal pens in the barn were closed off, as it was later in the day when we visited. Some of the paths are not fully paved, so please wear sturdy footwear. They have educational programming here, although you can also just come and enjoy the gorgeous natural beauty of the park.
撰写日期:2021年5月23日
此点评为 Tripadvisor 会员所写的主观评论,并不代表 TripAdvisor LLC 的观点。

kzsull01
康涅狄格温莎355 条分享
2020年9月
We have visited Northwest Park and Nature Preserve in Windsor, Connecticut many times over the past 30 years, most recently on Saturday, September 12th, and have always enjoyed it. The park is a diverse habitat with forests, fields, streams and a lot of scenic views, with almost 500 acres and 12 miles of hiking trails. The park is really a beautiful resource and a hidden gem in Windsor, Connecticut.

This review is divided into sections, including the following:

• An Overview of the Park Trails;
• A Note to PLEASE LEASH YOUR DOG(S);:
• Detailed Information on Some of the Trails that We Hiked;
• The Nature Center;
• The Gardens, Maple Sugar House, and Farm Animals:
• The Luddy Tobacco Museum;
• Picnicking, the Playground, and Dog Park: and
• Some history about the Rainbow Reservoir Dam

An Overview of the Park Trails:

The many trails in the park vary in length, are well-maintained, for the most part, and are nice to hike. However, you definitely need a map to hike the trails. This review provides information on the recommended trails as well as one trail that is not recommended to take under the ‘Information on Some of the Trails that We Hiked’ Section. Various combinations of trails that we have hiked are also addressed in this section.

In addition, some of the trails are unnamed and are not well-marked and could only be found by a map. The park offers a nice detailed map/guide of their trail system, which is quite helpful to navigate the trails because some of the Unnamed Trails connect with the named and marked trails. This map has been available near the Nature Center. Some of the main trails even provide a very good view of Rainbow Reservoir on the Farmington River and the associated boating activities happening on the river. A map is also available on a separate section of the Northwestpark.org web site which has directions to the park and a map of the park.

A Note to PLEASE LEASH YOUR DOG(S):

The only real drawback of the park to us is that although it has a very nice dog park with separate sections for small dogs and for large dogs, as well as signs to keep your dog on a leash, occasionally there are loose dogs on the trails or other parts of the park where they should be on a leash. We have even seen large dogs such as German Shepherd, Great Danes and Bulldogs loose.

Letting dogs loose in this park, except for in the dog park, is potentially dangerous and a risk to everyone in the park, including children, families, other dogs on a leash (especially smaller dogs), farm animals and much more. I also get an uncomfortable feeling when I see a dog loose because I don’t know what to expect if I don’t know the dog, and how the dog may react to the numerous kinds of wildlife in the park and vice versa.

Detailed Information on Some of the Trails that We Hiked:

Note that the below does not include all of the trails or all variations to these trails.

1). The Bog Trail - is a very nice trail for a short walk through the forest and a bog that you could view from the trail. There are helpful interpretative markers with write-ups about the bog that make the walk interesting and educational. The markers are also written in Braille.

2). The Conservation Trail (Blue Trail) to Rainbow Reservoir and the old dam at ‘Oil City’ – We have wanted to take the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail) directly to Rainbow Reservoir to see the historical remains of the old dam at “Oil City” multiple times. It looks like this is the most direct and quickest way to the Reservoir. However, it is not that easy or even very nice. We tried taking this trail this past April and it was flooded. We tried on September 12th and don’t recommend taking this trail and don’t plan to hike it again. It is definitely not worth going through the mud and the unstable boards and tree branches to cross the muddy and wet path. My boots sank into the mud and got quite dirty. Also, the view of the Rainbow Reservoir is not very impressive nor are the remains of the old dam once we reached it. It was not even worth taking pictures of any of it, even though it has historical significance being the site of the old ‘Oil City Hydroelectric Plant’ as mentioned in the ‘History Associated with the Rainbow Reservoir’ Section of this review. We could see why there isn’t a bridge over the wet and muddy path leading to this part of the park. There is even a sign for a boat launch leading to this section of the park, but I am not sure how you could get a boat across this area or where you would even launch a boat.

3). The Pond Trail - is quite scenic and even has an overlook. There are views of both the Beaver Pond and Rainbow Reservoir on this trail. As mentioned previously, we tried to take the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail) directly to the Rainbow Reservoir on April 10th but couldn’t because it was flooded out. Also, going this way is quite hilly beyond the sign that says “Oil City”. We ended up taking the Pond Trail, which may be a bit hilly to get to and even walking it, but is a nice trail for its scenery once you are on it. This trail is a ways beyond the sign that says “Oil City” on the Conservation Trail.

4). The Hemlock Trail – We got to this trail from the Pond Trail. The Hemlock Trail, was quite hilly and rugged with an area of rocks that was hard to cross.

5). The Rainbow Reservoir Trail - is quite long, over four miles long (from the Nature Center to the top/beginning of the trail, taking the trail, then heading back). There were some rugged wet areas that were hard to get through at the time of our hike in early April. We recommend getting to this trail by another trail, such as the Soft Forest Trail and an Unnamed Trail that connects to it, or other trails that lead to it using the map. However, you could see the dam and the current hydroelectric plant from this trail.

6). The trails that we prefer are a combination of trails. Each combination of trails is slightly over two miles from the Nature Center and back. Note that there are a couple of wet spots on the Wetland Trail (Yellow Trail), going the ways described in #s 5, 6 and 7, but they are not hard to get through):

• Starting at the Nature Center, take the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail), which will be the main road at this point, towards the Tobacco Sheds. After the first Tobacco Shed you will no longer be on the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail). Continue straight on the main road alongside Long Field on the right, part of the way based on the map, and North Field on your left.
• After the second Tobacco Shed take a left onto an Unnamed Trail alongside North Field on your left,
• Follow this trail to the Wetland Trail taking a (slight) right onto the Wetland Trail (Yellow Trail).
• Follow the Wetland Trail to the Reservoir.
• Once you reach the Reservoir, take a left remaining on the Wetland Trail. There are some nice views of the Reservoir on this part of the trail.
• Go past Rugar Field, which will be on your left.
• While still on the trail, take a left onto an Unnamed Trail, which leads to the Conservation (Blue Trail)
• Once you reach the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail) continue on it straight going by the Marsh.
• Then take a left on the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail) heading back to the Nature Center.

7). There are multiple variations of what is described in #5 above.

• Starting at the Nature Center, variations include following the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail), which is the main road at this point, to the first Tobacco Shed.
• Take a left after the Tobacco Shed, remaining on the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail) alongside North Field...
• Follow the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail) to an Unnamed Trail, going past the intersection with the Wetland Trail (Yellow Trail).
• Take a right on the Unnamed Trail to go past Rugar Field heading towards the Wetland Trail (Yellow Trail).
• Follow the Unnamed Trail, taking a right onto the Wetland Trail where you will see nice views of the Reservoir,
• Continue to follow the Wetland Trail. Go right on the Wetland Trail before the Rainbow Reservoir Trail (Red Trail) marker, which will lead back onto the Unnamed Trail that will take you in back of the second Tobacco Shed. You could also stay on the Wetland Trail going right, instead of taking the Unnamed Trail.
• In either case, continue back towards the Nature Center.

8). Another variation of #5 or #6 is to do the trails in reserve.

• When going in reverse, you could follow the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail) from the Nature Center west towards the Reservoir to the Unnamed Trail, which is before the Wetland Trail that leads to the Marsh. There is a sign that says that the Unnamed Trail leads to the Marsh Overlook
• Taking a right on the Unnamed Trail will lead you to the Marsh which has a nice boardwalk that overlooks the Marsh. Taking the Wetland Trail, instead of the Unnamed Trail, will also lead to the Marsh and its overlook.
• From the Marsh Overlook Boardwalk, when facing the Wetland Trail, take a left onto the Wetland Trail.
• Follow the Wetland Trail heading north to where it intersects with the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail). Take a left onto the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail).
• Follow the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail) until you reach an Unnamed Trail.
• Take a right on the Unnamed Trail to go past Rugar Field heading towards the Wetland Trail (Yellow Trail).
• Follow the Unnamed Trail taking a right onto the Wetland Trail where you will see nice views of the Reservoir,
• Continue to follow the Wetland Trail. Go right on the Wetland Trail before the Rainbow Reservoir Trail (Red Trail) marker, which will lead back onto the Unnamed Trail that will take you in back of the second Tobacco Shed. You could also stay on the Wetland Trail going right, instead of taking the Unnamed Trail.
• In either case, continue back towards the Nature Center.

The Nature Center:

When open, the park’s Nature Center has an interesting assortment of wildlife, including snakes, turtles, frogs and fish as well as additional exhibits on the species of animals native to the park, all with good write-ups and is quite educational. Exhibits on the weather associated with the park and the center’s geothermal heating and cooling system are also included as well as a gift shop.

The Gardens, Maple Sugar House, and Farm Animals:

The multiple types of gardens, including the butterfly and organic demonstration gardens are interesting and so is the maple sugar house, which are all seasonal. The maple sugar house has been open in the April timeframe but I am not sure what other times of year that it is open.

When open, the animal barn is quite nice with various types of heritage breed farm animals, including a donkey (named Cisco). goats, sheep, chickens, rabbits, turkeys, pigs, and ducks. However, I have not seen any pigs there recently. Most of the animals come outside when the barn is not open. Two separate areas in the park include a pasture with the park’s cows, Strawberry and Tara, and another large section with a mule and a hinny, all quite unique. There is also a pond with turtles and multiple types of fish that children really enjoy.

The Luddy Tobacco Museum:

Located within the park is a Tobacco Museum (Luddy Tobacco Museum and Archives) which is housed in two separate buildings, when open. One of the buildings has exhibits of the early and modern types of equipment and the process used in growing and harvesting the cigar tobacco crop. The other building is an archive exhibiting paintings, photographs, writings and other artifacts related to tobacco. Both buildings provide a good representation of the history associated with the park and of the tobacco growing industry in the Connecticut River Valley.

Picnicking, Playground, and Dog Park:

The park could be used for picnicking as well as group functions, having multiple picnic areas, including a picnic pavilion, a warming shed and a group of picnic tables under trees. Some of the picnic areas require a permit in order to use them.

The park could be enjoyed by children as well as adults, and includes a playground with multiple activities for children. It is a nice place to walk a dog and includes a fenced in Dog Park with benches with two separate sections, one for small dogs and another for large dogs. The only thing is dogs are not allowed in most of the buildings in the park and should be on a leash, in other areas of the park, in particular on the trails.

History Associated with the Rainbow Reservoir:

The Rainbow Reservoir Dam, which could be viewed from the park (from the Rainbow Reservoir Trail), has an interesting history. It had a hydroelectric plant and dam (built in 1889, which was about a mile away from the current dam and plant) that produced power from water wheels powered by Farmington River operated turbines. The power was transferred to Hartford and powered the first polyphaser motor and was the first long distance transfer of power (11 miles, using copper wires) in the United States.
Also, the area was at one time called “Oil City” with the discovery of oil on the rocks near the dam, which also has an interesting history associated with it. The old power plant was once called the Oil City Hydroelectric Plant!!

There is also a Dinosaur Footprint near the Rainbow Reservoir Dam off of the Triassic Trail.

The park is a hidden gem in Windsor, a great place to get away for a while, relax and enjoy nature as well as the exhibits on display (when the Nature Center and Tobacco Museum are open).. The park has changed throughout the many years that we have been going there, with many improvements. It has a lot to offer with something for everyone and changes with the seasons with several events throughout the year, including a country fair, coffee houses, concerts, and day camps. It’s a great place to visit for the whole family.
撰写日期:2020年9月21日
此点评为 Tripadvisor 会员所写的主观评论,并不代表 TripAdvisor LLC 的观点。

Tourist828116
3 条分享
2020年7月
It's a beautiful park with excellent facilities and a wide variety of walking/hiking paths. Paths are very well marked and clear. It was very buggy due to wetlands, so recommend using some kind of but repellent, but it's a beautiful spot that I'd definitely go back to.
撰写日期:2020年7月8日
此点评为 Tripadvisor 会员所写的主观评论,并不代表 TripAdvisor LLC 的观点。

kzsull01
康涅狄格温莎355 条分享
2020年4月
We have visited Northwest Park and Nature Preserve in Windsor, Connecticut many times over the past 30 years and have always enjoyed it. The park is a diverse habitat with forests, fields, streams and a lot of scenic views, with almost 500 acres and 12 miles of hiking trails. The park is really a beautiful resource and a hidden gem in Windsor, Connecticut.

The many trails in the park vary in length, are well-maintained and are nice to hike. However, you definitely need a map to hike the trails. Some of the trails are unnamed and are not well-marked and could only be found by a map. The park offers a nice detailed map/guide of their trail system, which is quite helpful to navigate the trails because some of the Unnamed Trails connect with the named and marked trails. This map has been available near the Nature Center. Some of the main trails even provide a very good view of Rainbow Reservoir on the Farmington River and the associated boating activities happening on the river. A map is also available on a separate section of the Northwestpark.org web site which has directions to the park and a map of the park.

The only drawback of the park to us is that although it has a very nice dog park with separate sections for small dogs and for large dogs, as well as signs to keep your dog on a leash, occasionally there are loose dogs on the trails or other parts of the park where they should be on a leash. We have even seen large dogs such as German Sheppards, Great Danes and Bull dogs loose.
Letting dogs loose in this park, except for in the dog park, is potentially dangerous and a risk to everyone in the park, including children, families, other dogs on a leash (especially smaller dogs), farm animals and much more. I also get an uncomfortable feeling when I see a dog loose because I don’t know what to expect if I don’t know the dog, and how the dog may react to the numerous kinds of wildlife in the park and vice versa.

The remaining sections of this review provide details on the various aspects of the park, including: information on some of the trails, the Nature Center, the gardens, the maple sugar house, the beautiful farm animals, the Tobacco Museum, picnicking, the playground, the dog park, and some history about the Rainbow Reservoir Dam, even about the Dinosaur Footprint located there.

Information on Some of the Trails that We Hiked:

Note that the below does not include all of the trails or all variations to these trails.

1). The Bog Trail - is a nice trail for a short walk through the forest and a bog that you could view from the trail. There are helpful interpretative markers with write-ups about the bog that make the walk interesting and educational. The markers are also written in Braille.

2). The Pond Trail - is quite scenic and even has an overlook. There are views of both the Beaver Pond and Rainbow Reservoir on this trail. We tried to take the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail) directly to the Rainbow Reservoir on April 10th but couldn’t because it was flooded out. Also, going this way is quite hilly beyond the sign that says “Oil City”. We ended up taking the Pond Trail, which may be a bit hilly to get to and even walking it, but is a nice trail for its scenery once you are on it. This trail is a ways beyond the sign that says “Oil City” on the Conservation Trail.

3). The Hemlock Trail – We got to this trail from the Pond Trail. The Hemlock Trail, was quite hilly and rugged with an area of rocks that was hard to cross.

4). The Rainbow Reservoir Trail - is quite long, over four miles long (from the Nature Center to the top/beginning of the trail, taking the trail, then heading back). There were some rugged wet areas that were hard to get through at the time of our hike in early April. We recommend getting to this trail by another trail, such as the Soft Forest Trail and an Unnamed Trail that connects to it, or other trails that lead to it using the map. However, you could see the dam and the current hydroelectric plant from this trail.

5). The trails that we prefer are a combination of trails. Each combination of trails is slightly over two miles from the Nature Center and back. Note that there are a couple of wet spots on the Wetland Trail (Yellow Trail), going the ways described in #s 5, 6 and 7, but they are not hard to get through):

• Starting at the Nature Center, take the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail), which will be the main road at this point, towards the Tobacco Sheds. After the first Tobacco Shed you will no longer be on the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail). Continue straight on the main road alongside Long Field on the right, part of the way based on the map, and North Field on your left.
• After the second Tobacco Shed take a left onto an Unnamed Trail alongside North Field on your left,
• Follow this trail to the Wetland Trail taking a (slight) right onto the Wetland Trail (Yellow Trail).
• Follow the Wetland Trail to the Reservoir.
• Once you reach the Reservoir, take a left remaining on the Wetland Trail. There are some nice views of the Reservoir on this part of the trail.
• Go past Rugar Field, which will be on your left.
• While still on the trail, take a left onto an Unnamed Trail, which leads to the Conservation (Blue Trail)
• Once you reach the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail) continue on it straight going by the Marsh.
• Then take a left on the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail) heading back to the Nature Center.

6). There are multiple variations of what is described in #5 above.

• Starting at the Nature Center, variations include following the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail), which is the main road at this point, to the first Tobacco Shed.
• Take a left after the Tobacco Shed, remaining on the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail) alongside North Field...
• Follow the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail) to an Unnamed Trail, going past the intersection with the Wetland Trail (Yellow Trail).
• Take a right on the Unnamed Trail to go past Rugar Field heading towards the Wetland Trail (Yellow Trail).
• Follow the Unnamed Trail, taking a right onto the Wetland Trail where you will see nice views of the Reservoir,
• Continue to follow the Wetland Trail. Go right on the Wetland Trail before the Rainbow Reservoir Trail (Red Trail) marker, which will lead back onto the Unnamed Trail that will take you in back of the second Tobacco Shed. You could also stay on the Wetland Trail going right, instead of taking the Unnamed Trail.
• In either case, continue back towards the Nature Center.

7). Another variation of #5 or #6 is to do the trails in reserve.

• When going in reverse, you could follow the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail) from the Nature Center west towards the Reservoir to the Unnamed Trail, which is before the Wetland Trail that leads to the Marsh. There is a sign that says that the Unnamed Trail leads to the Marsh Overlook
• Taking a right on the Unnamed Trail will lead you to the Marsh which has a nice boardwalk that overlooks the Marsh. Taking the Wetland Trail, instead of the Unnamed Trail, will also lead to the Marsh and its overlook.
• From the Marsh Overlook Boardwalk, when facing the Wetland Trail, take a left onto the Wetland Trail.
• Follow the Wetland Trail heading north to where it intersects with the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail). Take a left onto the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail).
• Follow the Conservation Trail (Blue Trail) until you reach an Unnamed Trail.
• Take a right on the Unnamed Trail to go past Rugar Field heading towards the Wetland Trail (Yellow Trail).
• Follow the Unnamed Trail taking a right onto the Wetland Trail where you will see nice views of the Reservoir,
• Continue to follow the Wetland Trail. Go right on the Wetland Trail before the Rainbow Reservoir Trail (Red Trail) marker, which will lead back onto the Unnamed Trail that will take you in back of the second Tobacco Shed. You could also stay on the Wetland Trail going right, instead of taking the Unnamed Trail.
• In either case, continue back towards the Nature Center.

The Nature Center:

When open, the park’s Nature Center has an interesting assortment of wildlife, including snakes, turtles, frogs and fish as well as additional exhibits on the species of animals native to the park, all with good write-ups and is quite educational. Exhibits on the weather associated with the park and the center’s geothermal heating and cooling system are also included as well as a gift shop.

The Gardens, Maple Sugar House, and Farm Animals:

The multiple types of gardens, including the butterfly and organic demonstration gardens are interesting and so is the maple sugar house, which are all seasonal. The maple sugar house has been open in the April timeframe but I am not sure what other times of year that it is open.

The animal barn is quite nice with various types of heritage breed farm animals, including a donkey (named Cisco). goats, sheep, chickens, rabbits, turkeys, pigs, and ducks. However, I have not seen any pigs there recently. Two separate areas in the park include a pasture with the park’s cows, Strawberry and Tara, and another large section with a mule and a hinny, all quite unique. There is also a pond with turtles and multiple types of fish that children really enjoy.

The Luddy Tobacco Museum:

Located within the park is a Tobacco Museum (Luddy Tobacco Museum and Archives) which is housed in two separate buildings, when open. One of the buildings has exhibits of the early and modern types of equipment and the process used in growing and harvesting the cigar tobacco crop. The other building is an archive exhibiting paintings, photographs, writings and other artifacts related to tobacco. Both buildings provide a good representation of the history associated with the park and of the tobacco growing industry in the Connecticut River Valley.

Picnicking, Playground, and Dog Park:

The park could be used for picnicking as well as group functions, having multiple picnic areas, including a picnic pavilion, a warming shed and a group of picnic tables under trees. Some of the picnic areas require a permit in order to use them.

The park could be enjoyed by children as well as adults, and includes a playground with multiple activities for children. It is a nice place to walk a dog and includes a fenced in Dog Park with benches with two separate sections, one for small dogs and another for large dogs. The only thing is dogs are not allowed in most of the buildings in the park and should be on a leash, in other areas of the park, in particular on the trails.

History Associated with the Rainbow Reservoir:

The Rainbow Reservoir Dam, which could be viewed from the park (from the Rainbow Reservoir Trail), has an interesting history. It had a hydroelectric plant and dam (built in 1889, which was about a mile away from the current dam and plant) that produced power from water wheels powered by Farmington River operated turbines. The power was transferred to Hartford and powered the first polyphaser motor and was the first long distance transfer of power (11 miles, using copper wires) in the United States.
Also, the area was at one time called “Oil City” with the discovery of oil on the rocks near the dam, which also has an interesting history associated with it. The old power plant was once called the Oil City Hydroelectric Plant!!
There is also a Dinosaur Footprint near the Rainbow Reservoir Dam off of the Triassic Trail.

The park is a hidden gem in Windsor, a great place to get away for a while, relax and enjoy nature as well as the exhibits on display (when the Nature Center and Tobacco Museum are open).. The park has changed throughout the many years that we have been going there, with many improvements. It has a lot to offer with something for everyone and changes with the seasons with several events throughout the year, including a country fair, coffee houses, concerts, and day camps. It’s a great place to visit for the whole family.
撰写日期:2020年4月27日
此点评为 Tripadvisor 会员所写的主观评论,并不代表 TripAdvisor LLC 的观点。

Helen S
康涅狄格西哈特福德96 条分享
2020年2月 • 夫妻情侣
What a beautiful place to go for a wonderful hike with my husband and our dog. So many choices of things to see and I can't wait to go back for more exploring.
撰写日期:2020年2月17日
此点评为 Tripadvisor 会员所写的主观评论,并不代表 TripAdvisor LLC 的观点。

johnatod
康涅狄格Avon63 条分享
2019年7月
This wasn't a planned visit, we found the museum while at Northwest Park and the name says it all--the history of tobacco farming in the Connecticut River Valley. One building contains information on the history of tobacco in the state and displays of cigar tobacco paraphernalia (boxes, wrappers, implements, etc.). An adjacent tobacco shed shows the process of curing the leaves. If you worked in this industry or smoke cigars, this place may be of interest, but for the general public, it's underwhelming and not worth a special trip.

Side note. We visited in July and the smell of manure was strong and the flies numerous.
撰写日期:2019年10月2日
此点评为 Tripadvisor 会员所写的主观评论,并不代表 TripAdvisor LLC 的观点。

Totty
南卡罗来纳石山105 条分享
2019年9月 • 夫妻情侣
We were waiting on a flight out at Hartford and wanted some exercise close by. This was the perfect spot and we learned a lot while we were there. Those in the area are fortunate to have such a natural environment to enjoy!

Thanks for sharing!
撰写日期:2019年9月6日
此点评为 Tripadvisor 会员所写的主观评论,并不代表 TripAdvisor LLC 的观点。

Aimee H
38 条分享
2019年8月 • 家庭
This is a great park to visit with or without kids. In my case,I have two younger ones and we loved it. It used to be a tobacco farm but now it’s a nature center for kids and an interesting tobacco museum. They even have animals for the kids to learn about. The animals are very well kept and the Nature center was well done. We spent about two and half hours here just wandering and exploring. We also had a little picnic. They do have about 12 miles (I think that’s what I read) of walking trails. I highly recommend it if you are looking for a peaceful relaxing experience. We visited on a Monday around noon. Free activity. Good bathrooms. Friendly helpful staff.
撰写日期:2019年8月19日
此点评为 Tripadvisor 会员所写的主观评论,并不代表 TripAdvisor LLC 的观点。

whmtnhiker
康涅狄格西哈特福德54 条分享
2019年8月
We live in West Hartford but enjoy coming to Northwest Park for a dogwalk and exploration. This park has it all and all in one place! Farm animals, exhibits, gardens, walking trails and recreation amenities. It is also a 4 season park. This is a favorite place when we want a change of scenery for outdoor activities.
撰写日期:2019年8月16日
此点评为 Tripadvisor 会员所写的主观评论,并不代表 TripAdvisor LLC 的观点。

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